A good diet is a key factor in good health and a happy approach to life.

At pure+natural we believe in good healthy food...and we love it!

Good food is tasty and nutritious. As we say

Glossary of food terms

In setting yourself a good diet there are some basic words and things you should first understand. Here is a list of key words and their meanings.

Carbohydrates Carbohydrates provide the body with its main source of energy. There are "simple carbohydrates" - or sugars including glucose - and "complex" ones - found in whole food like grains and vegetables and greens. Excess glucose is stored ready for use in the body - but when the body's reserves are full they are turned to and stored as fat.
Cholesterol Cholesterol is believed to affect the incidence of heart disease. Eating too much fat or oil, particularly certain saturated fats can raise blood cholesterol levels. Cholesterol can come from your own body (made primarily by the liver) and dietary cholesterol from the foods you eat.
Fat Fat is how the body stores energy most efficiently. Fats are necessary for metabolic functions including the maintenance of healthy skin and hair. Too much fat is damaging to the body and your health. There are different types of fats - see below - some are worse than others.
Fat reasonable limit According to the Heart Foundation a reasonable total daily intact limit is 90g of fat for the average man and 68g for the average woman. Try to limit your fat intake to no more than 30% of your diet - see the fat table below and the healthy eating pyramid.
Fats - mono-unsaturated Found in some foods including avocados, olives and peanuts and their oils. They increase cholesterol levels and are high in kilojoules.
Fats - polyunsaturated Found mainly in vegetable foods and oils such as safflower, sunflower, corn, soy bean and grape seeds. These can largely replace saturated fats.
Fats - saturated Found mainly in animal foods such as dairy foods, egg yolks, meat and offal, but also in some vegetables like palm oil and coconut oils.
Macro-nutrients Are necessary in large doses for the effective use of vitamins and minerals. Macro-nutrients include oxygen, water, protein, carbo-hydrates and fat.
Micro-nutrients Are necessary in very small doses for the effective use of vitamins and minerals.
Minerals Minerals are inorganic (or non-carbon) natural substances . There are major minerals (where the body requires more than 100mg/day like calcium and potassium and phosphorous) and minor minerals (like iron zinc and manganese). They are essential to the body's functions.
Niacin Also known as vitamin B3. It is essential for the release of energy from food, normal growth, blood cell formation and protects against cancer. A good source is poultry, fish, beans, peas, yeast, whole grain products and beef.
Oxygen Oxygen is necessary for the burning of energy in our body's cells.
Protein Proteins is important in the body's growth and repair, our muscles and organs, antibodies and some hormones are made up of protein.
Recommended dietary intake (RDI) RDI are used as a basis for daily dietary planning. They are a set of standard food intake guidelines established by food nutritionists and scientists. See below table.
Vitamins Vitamins are necessary in small amounts for sustaining life. Vitamins are organic (contain carbon and come from living or once living things) and are found in food.
Water Water makes up over 60% of our body weight and is essential in our bodies biochemical reactions and carrying of chemicals within the body.
Sodium Often just thought of as salt, although salt is made up of sodium and chloride. So salt is only one source of sodium. Sodium is also found in baking sodium and baking powder, milk, meats and some vegetables. Sodium is essential in nearly every body function including water balance and muscle contraction. High sodium intake is linked to high blood pressure. Whilst salt is essential, you should not have too much. A recommended daily intake is 2,400 mg.

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Fats in food

The average healthy man should consume no more than 80 to 90 grams of fat per day, and an average healthy woman 60 to 80 grams per day.

Much of this fat should be vegetable fats - particularly polyunsaturated fats.

The following table sets out the level of fat content in each 100gm of food - listed in order of lowest fat content to highest fat. The table is an estimate only of fat based on averages. For each type of food the table shows what that food is as a percentage of what the average person's reasonable maximum daily intake of fat should be to maintain good health.

 

 

% of average recommended 
daily fat intake

 

Food

Fat (g)

Man

Woman

Milk - skim

-

-

-

Yoghurt - skim

-

-

-

Egg white

-

-

-

Fruit

-

-

-

Salad - fresh

-

-

-

Vegetables

-

-

-

Vegemite

-

-

-

Rice - white

0.2

0.2%

0.3%

Fish - Whiting

0.5

0.6%

0.7%

Rice - brown

0.6

0.7%

0.9%

Cheese - low fat cottage

1.0

1.1%

1.5%

Lentil

1.1

1.2%

1.6%

Fish - average

1.8

2.0%

2.6%

Bread - wholemeal

2.0

2.2%

2.9%

Turkey

2.2

2.4%

3.2%

Chicken breast

2.3

2.6%

3.4%

Rump steak

3.0

3.3%

4.4%

Tuna - canned in brine

3.0

3.3%

4.4%

Lamb - fillet

3.6

4.0%

5.3%

Milk - full cream

4.0

4.4%

5.9%

Yoghurt - full cream

4.0

4.4%

5.9%

Scotch fillet steak

4.4

4.9%

6.5%

Breadcrumbs

4.4

4.9%

6.5%

Coleslaw - light dressing

4.5

5.0%

6.6%

Ham

5.0

5.6%

7.4%

Potatoe - roast

5.0

5.6%

7.4%

Soy beans

5.0

5.6%

7.4%

Tofu

5.0

5.6%

7.4%

Chick peas

5.7

6.3%

8.4%

Biscuits - crispbread

6.0

6.7%

8.8%

Lamb chop

6.6

7.3%

9.7%

Cheese - ricotta

8.5

9.4%

12.5%

Muesli - natural

9.0

10.0%

13.2%

Fried rice

9.0

10.0%

13.2%

Hamburger - small

10.0

11.1%

14.7%

Egg whole

11.0

12.2%

16.2%

Mayonnaise - light

13.0

14.4%

19.1%

Sausage roll

14.0

15.6%

20.6%

Meat pie

14.0

15.6%

20.6%

French fries

15.0

16.7%

22.1%

Pizza

15.0

16.7%

22.1%

Biscuits - savoury

16.0

17.8%

23.5%

Fish - deep fried

16.0

17.8%

23.5%

Avocado

22.0

24.4%

32.4%

Chicken - take away

22.0

24.4%

32.4%

Tuna - canned in oil

22.0

24.4%

32.4%

Sausages - grilled pork

24.0

26.7%

35.3%

Chocolate

31.0

34.4%

45.6%

Cheese - cheddar and tasty

33.0

36.7%

48.5%

Potato crisps

34.0

37.8%

50.0%

Full cream (per 100ml)

35.0

38.9%

51.5%

Pork

35.0

38.9%

51.5%

Salad dressing - Italian/French

37.0

41.1%

54.4%

Salami

38.0

42.2%

55.9%

Mayonnaise - regular

49.0

54.4%

72.1%

Pine nuts

51.0

56.7%

75.0%

Almond nuts

54.0

60.0%

79.4%

Peanut butter

55.0

61.1%

80.9%

Pecan nuts

71.0

78.9%

104.4%

Margarine - polyunsaturated

81.0

90.0%

119.1%

Butter

82.0

91.1%

120.6%

Dripping - lard (cooking fat)

100.0

111.1%

147.1%

Olive oil

100.0

111.1%

147.1%

Nutrition Table

Click here for the pure+natural nutrition table >>

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